Viewing entries tagged
florist

I called you back

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The process involved in re-branding has been lengthy because I am indecisive. I knew what I wanted but I can’t draw and I can’t design and I wanted it to be personal so I handed it over to people better qualified than myself. I’m lucky enough to have talented friends and family to whom I can entrust such jobs and who take my ideas and make them happen.

My brother designed the initial branding for Wildflower and I loved it. But it’s been nearly ten years and with new premises and a new van, it seemed like a good time for change.

Alice writes a great blog. She cooks and illustrates. Our parents are friends. So after admiring her drawings of cheese and vegetables and dogs (and in particular, a stollen) I asked if she would like to draw some flowers. We emailed back and forth, she got it completely. I needed this artwork to say something about my business. It’s lo-fi, a mixture of fruit, flowers and insects, and completely beautiful. It wholly captures the way I think about flowers - there are nasturtiums and dill and parrot tulips and ferns and all the good things.

A friend of Beth was kind enough to re-touch Alice’s drawing (in exchange for flowers) and then it was sent over to my brother. He had already come up with the Blume logo and I decided to use the same type again. I’ll be honest - I deal in flowers but the last thing I wanted was something that screamed “BRIDAL” or “SHABBY CHIC”, so the typeface is modernist and the one that the Guggenheim has used over the years.

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So, for everyone that’s been handed my phone number on a scrap of paper over the last few months - call by and have a card! Sometimes at home I say to Paddy, “Oh hi, have we met? Here’s my card, I’m a florist, yeah, mainly events and weddings, some custom work…” and I hand him a card. He humours me, takes the card, and comments on the beautiful design and thickness of card.

Mother’s Day was a whirlwind of new faces and some familiar ones too. Brides of years gone by call in for flowers or just to say hello which is always lovely. My own mother was made to wait until this week for her flowers, (fifty stems of ranunculus) but on the day, made deliveries and in her five minute tidy-up, did a better job than I could in half an hour.

I’ve been shamelessly filling my Instagram feed with photos of ranunculus. I try not to have favourites but I think if I was forced, ranunculus might be it.

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Lupin fever

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Today I bought my first lupins of the season. Lupins are one of those flowers that don’t last a long time in the vase but that has never bothered me. I’d be happy to have anything looking that good for just a few days. They have exactly the right combination of geometricity and unruliness with the added bonus of arriving in mixed colour bunches.

I packed up the van with said lupins, cornflowers and roses among other flowers, and headed to the nearby barracks where a group of lovely women had asked me to run a morning of flower school. After a bit of foliage foraging (mounds of hebe, copper beech, stachys and clematis) we set to work and the group did themselves proud.

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As an aside, I also enjoyed my little insight into life “behind the wire”. I was green with envy at their collection of beautiful tureens and dishes (for flowers obviously, not soup).

Decay

A part of what I do is putting flowers weekly into bars, restaurants and offices. Monday is the big day for this so everywhere looks welcoming for the week ahead. It also means that my studio becomes a graveyard of week-old flowers that generally go straight to the compost bin in my mother’s garden. Last week however, there were a couple of items that came back in vases and I didn’t throw them away, they sat all week in jars on the shelves instead.

Now, I have plenty of friends and relatives who are guilty of hanging onto their flowers until there is nothing left. I have seen lilies in a vase with no leaves, no stamen, no petals… just a stem. And I moan about this. I watch strangers in the supermarket buying flowers that I would have binned a week ago. That said, the sunflowers that had lost all their petals and become brown and gold seed domes, and the peonies that have retained all their colour but curled in on themselves and dried, seemed a bit too beautiful to compost.

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John Blakemore Tulips

The cutting garden

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Yesterday was spent with my good friend Karen of Widehaugh House near Hexham. Karen was teaching a cutting garden course which I took part in, mainly turning up to eat an incredible lunch and then snip at her garden and create something beautiful with what was available. All the rain of last month, followed by the heat of the last week has meant that at last things are growing and we collected clematis, scented roses, cornflowers, aquilegia, lilac, euphorbia and wallflowers. To call this work would be ridiculous, there is nothing better on a Wednesday than sipping wine in a beautiful garden, feeling the sun on my back and turning my phone off to play with flowers that money can’t buy. The Dutchman cannot compete with this garden. And since July brings a new home with a south-facing garden I have good intentions of working on my own cutting garden…

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